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PLATO: Plagiarism Teaching Online

Glossary: R

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References

This is the section that should come at the end of any scholarly piece of academic writing. This includes full information on every item you have mentioned and cited (that can be accessed by a reader from a publicly available source) in your piece of writing, in the appropriate way. It is not the same as a Bibliography.

Referencing Style

This is the way the full reference is composed - the order of information, the use of bold or italic fonts, the use of upper and lower case, and punctuation. The same style can be used in either the Harvard system or the numeric system. All common Harvard styles begin with the author (surname, initials) then year/date.
Publishers always require that a given style is used within their publications - this gives a consistent appearance and can help typesetters. There is no particular reason for specifying a given style for Harvard referencing for unpublished works, though your tutor may do so to help you to be consistent.

Referencing System

A referencing system is a way of connecting the use of another author's work to a full description of the source. This is to enable any reader to locate a copy of the source. The Harvard system uses an in-text citation eg (Smith, 1972, p. 44) that refers to a full reference at the end. The numeric system makes use of an index number in the text that refers to a full reference at the bottom of the page or the end of the piece/section.